Current Lab Members

lammerding-lab-2016

Jan Lammerding Principal Investigator: Jan Lammerding, Ph.D.
Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Cornell University
235 Weill Hall; Ithaca, NY 14853
607-255-1700(Office)
607-255-1980 (Lab)
607-255-5961 (Fax)
jan.lammerding@cornell.edu

Postdoctoral Associates
Tyler Kirby Tyler Kirby, PhD
tk629@cornell.edu
I am interested in understanding how mechanical cues are transmitted and sensed within skeletal muscle cells, specifically focusing on how these mechanical forces are “sensed” by the cell nucleus and in turn, regulate the muscle phenotype.  Similarly, I am interested in understanding how nuclear mechanotransduction is affected by the normal aging process, and whether dysfunction in this critical cellular response leads to age-related muscle loss and frailty.
Visiting Scientists
Philipp Isermann Philipp Isermann
pi43@cornell.edu
I am interested in understanding the mechanical interaction  between the cytoskeleton and the nucleus during cell migration though confined microenvironments. In particular, I am researching what role the ‘LINC complex’, made of SUN proteins and nesprins at the nuclear envelope, plays in the force transmission and nuclear deformation during passage through small pores, and how the LINC complex is anchored at the nuclear envelope. Another research interest is the mechanism of nuclear envelope repair in interphase cells, for example, after nuclear envelope rupture during confined migration.
Philipp Isermann Lori L. Wallrath, PhD
lori-wallrath@uiowa.edu
I am performing research in the Lammerding laboratory while on sabbatical from the Department of Biochemistry, University of Iowa. My laboratory has generated Drosophila (fruit fly) models of muscular dystrophy caused by mutant lamins, intermediate filaments that line the inner nuclear membrane. I am interested in using techniques developed in the Lammerding laboratory to understand how mutant lamins alter nuclear sensitivity to mechanical stress and influence nuclear to cytoplasmic coupling.
PhD Students
Gregory Fedorchak Gregory Fedorchak
BMEgrf44@cornell.edu
I am a Biomedical engineering PhD student who is studying intracellular force transmission and mechanosensing in the context of muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy. I am particularly interested in the ‘LINC complex’ proteins that connect the cytoskeleton to the nucleus and thus provide a direct physical link to the genome. My million-dollar question is whether forces reaching the nucleus via the LINC complex can directly control gene expression in a predictable, biologically-meaningful way.
Ashley Earle Ashley Earle
BMEak978@cornell.edu
I am interested in understanding how lamins function in muscle regeneration, a complex process involving muscle progenitors, extracellular matrix (ECM), and immune cells, and most importantly why/how lamin mutations cause muscular dystrophy. I am focusing primarily on (1) ECM, and whether lamins are causing a misregulation of the muscle scaffold and (2) the function of muscle progenitors from lamin mutant mouse models and whether lamin mutations impair their potential to contribute to muscle tissue maintenance and repair process in vitro and in vivo.
Alex McGregor Alex McGregor
BMEalm358@cornell.edu
I am studying nuclear deformation during cell migration in both cancer cells and fibroblasts. Specifically, I am using collagen matrices and microfabricated devices to study cell migration in confined environments by live-cell imaging. My long-term goal (for my thesis) is to understand the role of nuclear deformation in cancer cell migration and invasion.
Jeremiah Hsia Jeremiah Hsia
BMCBch769@cornell.edu
I am interested in the biological consequences of cancer cell migration in confined spaces, such as gene expression changes, epigenetic modifications, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In particular, by exploring the impact of nuclear deformation and nuclear envelope rupture, I want to see if we can find potential targets for preventing/reducing cancer progression and invasion in the future.
Jeremy Keys Jeremy Keys
BMEjtk94@cornell.edu
I am a biomedical engineering PhD student who is interested in studying how cancer cells generate forces in order to migrate through confined spaces. Specifically, I am looking at how particular protein structures work together in order to either push or pull on the cell in order to deform the nucleus as it passes through constrictions. My goal is to elucidate the role of mechanical forces in cancer metastasis and invasion in order to determine potential avenues for treatment.
Pragya Shah Pragya Shah
BBSps848@cornell.edu
I am interested in studying the impact of cancer cell migration through tiny constricted spaces on genomic instability of those cells. Specifically, I want to understand the effects of migration induced deformation and rupture on genomic integrity of metastatic cancer cells. I am also interested in studying the DNA damage response pathways and how their impairment can affect migration induced DNA damage and genomic instability in different cancer cells.
Melanie Maurer Melanie Maurer
BMEmem529@cornell.edu
I am interested in elucidating the specific roles of lamins in cardiomyopathy through the use of an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model. Specifically, I am using lamin-deficient iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to understand the contributions of lamin to altered cellular and nuclear morphologies and mechanobiological behaviors by employing imaging and microfabrication techniques.
Master’s Students
Aaron Windsor Aaron Windsor
BMEajw49@cornell.edu
I am currently a Thin-film Process Engineer at the Cornell NanoScale Facility (CNF). After seven years of taking classes extramurally, I decided to pursue a Master in Science degree in Biomedical Engineering through Cornell’s Employee Degree Program. I will be working on the microfabrication of cell migration and flexible cantilever tissue gauge devices.


Undergraduates
Ishi Aron
Ishi Aron
ia84@cornell.edu
Alexandra Corbin
Alexandra Corbin
afc57@cornell.edu
Tulasi Gopalan
Tulasi Gopalan
tag93@cornell.edu
Sushruta Iruvanti
Sushruta Iruvanti
ski8@cornell.edu
Jerry Sarubbe
Jerry Sarubbe
gcs95@cornell.edu
Gwenda Law
Gwenda Law
ggl28@cornell.edu
Ryan Lin
Ryan Lin
rl579@cornell.edu
Jineet Patel
Jineet Patel
jjp257@cornell.edu
Connor McGuigan
Connor McGuigan
jjp257@cornell.edu
Shweta Modi
Shweta Modi
sm2258@cornell.edu
Holly Zheng
Holly Zheng
hcz3@cornell.edu

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